Posted On February 12, 2013 by Print This Post

Rejections-The Lessons Within with Diana Cosby

Diana Cosby tackles one of the hardest things about this industry – rejections.  Do you curl up in a ball for a week? Burn the offending manuscript?  Go out with girlfriends and drown your sorrows in chocolate and good vodka and then get your hungover butt back in the chair come morning? Diana gives great advice on how to handle rejection.

Rejections – The Lessons Within

Before I discuss rejections, I had to look up Merriam-Webster’s definition:100_9067_ret Rejection: 1 a: to refuse to accept, consider, submit to, take for some purpose, or use

I found it interesting that Merriam-Webster’s first reference was at the heart of a writer’s issue. But, remember, the impact of the rejection is that of our choosing.

I’m an extreme optimist. I believe everything happens for a reason, and I believe, however tragic, good can be found in any situation. It’s up to us to look past the hurt, to find the lessons within the challenging situation which will make us better, and will make us stronger.

Lets face it, if you decide to write and submit your stories, rejections are part of the process. Instead of focusing on the negativity of a rejection, let’s breakdown some of the many reasons why an agent or an editor doesn’t accept your work:

1. Their client list or book slots for a certain period is full – a pure business circumstance – not a rejection.

2. The agent or editor doesn’t connect with your voice. As an author, we want the person who is marketing our novel to not only believe in our work, but to be passionate about it as well. Anything less and they won’t market your work to booksellers and other venues to the fullest extent. So, a pass by an agent or an editor allows you to connect with another business professional who believes in your writing.

3. Your work is sub par – [show vs. tell.] less is more. I’ve always thought the amazing thing about writing is that each of us believes our current work-in-progress is the most amazing, well-written story. This belief, however realistic, is necessary for us to dedicate the months necessary to finish the novel. However brilliant your work, until it’s strong, emotionally evocative writing, it won’t be competitive in today’s market. Use the rejection as a tool to let you really focus on your story, to ensure it’s your strongest writing.

If you are fortunate enough to receive feedback from an agent or editor, review it. Does the feedback make sense to you? Do you think it will strengthen your novel? If so, use their comments as a base to tighten your work for future submissions.

The bottom line is, once your novel is completed, it’s a marketable
resource. If you don’t sell your book at this moment, don’t despair. Down the
road, pull it out, tighten it to a target market, then resubmit it.

4. Something about your story doesn’t fit their guidelines. It’s really important before you decide to submit your work to a line, that you’ve done your research. If your novel is about a shape shifter and you submit it to a line seeking inspirational stories, odds are you are going to receive a thanks but no thanks. Okay, so I used an extreme example, but I hope you see my point. It’s imperative to ensure your story is targeted at the correct market venue. Otherwise, it’s not a rejection, but a letter stating that your work doesn’t fit their line, which makes sense.

Rejections are tough to receive. When I hit 100, I quit counting them. I figured that I’d learned how to acquire them. :) But, I also learned the value of a rejection, that they’re far more than a slip of paper dismissing my work. Rejections are proof that I’m a dedicated professional, that I’m a writer who dares to believe in myself enough to submit my work, and most of all, a person who follows their dreams. Adversity tests if we truly want to write. Nothing worth anything is ever easy. Never give up – perseverance is the key.

What have rejections taught you?

My sincere best to each of you as you follow your heart.

***

Diana posed a great question. . .What have rejections taught you?

Maggie Toussaint talks about characters

***

His DestinyGIVEAWAY: Diana will give away a signed copy of “His Destiny” to one lucky commenter!

Bio:

Diana Cosby
www.dianacosby.com

A retired Navy Chief, AGC(AW), Diana Cosby is an international bestselling author of Scottish medieval romantic suspense. Diana has spoken at the Library Of Congress, appeared at Lady Jane’s Salon NYC, in Woman’s Day, on Texoma Living Magazine, USA Today’s romance blog, “Happily Ever After,” and MSN.com.

After retiring from the Navy, Diana dove into her passion – writing romance novels. With 34 moves behind her, she was anxious to create characters who reflected the amazing cultures and people she’s met throughout the world. Diana is currently working on the sixth book in the award-winning MacGruder brother’s series, and in August 2012, released her story in the anthology, “Born To Bite,” with Hannah Howell and Erica Ridley. Diana looks forward to the years of writing ahead and meeting the amazing people who will share this journey.

Diana’s latest project is with Grayson Country, TX. Habitat For Humanity – Romance Reader’s Build A House. Details!

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35 Responses to “Rejections-The Lessons Within with Diana Cosby”

  1. Diana – Thanks so much for being with us! I was wondering, with 100 rejections, was there a time you hit rock bottom and how did you pull yourself out?

    Robin Covington

    Posted by Robin Covington | February 12, 2013, 5:23 am
    • Good morning Robin, thank you so much for having me as a guest at Romance University. After about 9 1/2 years, I began to have serious doubts if I should continue writing. I asked for a sign that this truly was my calling. A couple of months later, I received the call. I took that as a yes. :)

      At times I have huge doubts, but I refocus on why I write, because of love of story, and because with each step forward, I can do more on a larger level with my charity work. Take care and have a super day!
      Sincerely,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:02 am
  2. Diana, thanks for joining us at RU! I really enjoyed meeting you at the NJRWA conference last October.

    Rejections have taught me to keep learning and to keep trying. Another thing I learned indirectly through the process is to be BOLD. When I quite following ALL the rules, I sold. ;)

    Posted by Tracey Devlyn | February 12, 2013, 5:42 am
    • Diana, thanks for joining us at RU! I really enjoyed meeting you at the NJRWA conference last October.

      Hi Tracey, it’s my sincere pleasure to be here. Great meeting you at NJRWA conference as well. :)

      Rejections have taught me to keep learning and to keep trying. Another thing I learned indirectly through the process is to be BOLD. When I quite following ALL the rules, I sold. ;)

      ~I totally agree. Follow your heart, be bold, dare to write the story that fills your mind. Congratulations on your success, and I wish you so much more!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:18 am
  3. Hi Diana,

    Rejections taught me reading and writing are subjective exercises. I’ve read books I didn’t like and wondered how they got published. Everyone is different and the search for the like mind is a journey.

    Mary Jo

    Posted by Mary Jo Burke | February 12, 2013, 6:30 am
  4. Thank you for your thoughtful post. I wish more authors would write about rejection because it’s very hard to deal with, especially if you’re new to the “game”.
    I’ve received many agent rejections for my urban fantasy novel, and it took me about a year to get the guts to keep sending it out after the first 10 rejections. After reading rare advice like yours, I’ve rewritten parts (especially the first paras), as well as my query letter. At the end of the day, I think I’ve got a better product because of the rejections. It’s a humbling exercise!

    Posted by Lucianne Poole | February 12, 2013, 8:33 am
    • Lucianne Poole wrote:
      Thank you for your thoughtful post. I wish more authors would write about rejection because it’s very hard to deal with, especially if you’re new to the “game”.

      ~Hi Lucianne, thank you so much for stopping by. Each rejection is so hard, and I believe it’s important to put each in a constructive perspective. It’s so essential to believe in ourselves and persevere. Each step forward is exactly that.

      I’ve received many agent rejections for my urban fantasy novel, and it took me about a year to get the guts to keep sending it out after the first 10 rejections.

      ~Good for you. Perseverance is what it takes.

      After reading rare advice like yours, I’ve rewritten parts (especially the first paras), as well as my query letter. At the end of the day, I think I’ve got a better product because of the rejections. It’s a humbling exercise!

      ~The entire process of writing is humbling, from the rejections, to the final sale, to the incredibly special moment of the fan letters. Seriously, they make you cry with their kind words. Please believe in yourself and persevere. I believe dreams are visions of what we can become. Take care, and I wish you every success!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:34 am
      • Thanks for taking the time to reply to my comment. It is encouraging and means a lot, especially in a business where meaningful feedback is rare!!

        Posted by Lucianne Poole | February 14, 2013, 3:35 am
        • Lucianne Poole wrote: Thanks for taking the time to reply to my comment. It is encouraging and means a lot, especially in a business where meaningful feedback is rare!!

          ~Lucianne, if anything I wrote helped, that’s what it’s all about. I’ve been blessed many times over by amazing writers who have taken time out of their busy day to help me. I’m humbled if I can help others as they pursue their dream. Take care, and I wish you every success!
          Happy Valentine’s Day!

          Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
          http://www.dianacosby.com

          Posted by Diana Cosby | February 14, 2013, 9:01 am
  5. I had 1,000 rejects by the time I got published. It took me 22 years of work to perfect my ability to tell a story. A writer has to keep in mind a reject is ONE person’s OPINION. ONE. I’ve seen struggling writers quit writing because of one person’s reject slip. You can’t be in this business and be successful if you can’t take rejections, pure and simple. And sometimes, a rejection is warranted and other times, it is an editor who doesn’t care for your style of writing. Best lesson I’ve learned is to trust yourself, trust your passion for telling a story the best you know how. And sooner or later, the book will find a ‘home’–an editor who likes your voice and loves your story. To thine self be true. Also, rejects build a writer’s strength and underwrites their determination to publish. And if you’re going to be a long-term player in this business, you need this kind of backbone. Nice article, Diana. Well thought out. Warmly, Lindsay McKenna

    Posted by Lindsay McKenna | February 12, 2013, 9:08 am
    • Lindsay McKenna wrote: I had 1,000 rejects by the time I got published. It took me 22 years of work to perfect my ability to tell a story.

      ~Hi Lindsay, thank you so much for stopping by. Holy cow, 1000 rejections. You’re truly an inspiration.

      A writer has to keep in mind a reject is ONE person’s OPINION. ONE.

      ~So true.

      I’ve seen struggling writers quit writing because of one person’s reject slip. You can’t be in this business and be successful if you can’t take rejections, pure and simple. And sometimes, a rejection is warranted and other times, it is an editor who doesn’t care for your style of writing. Best lesson I’ve learned is to trust yourself, trust your passion for telling a story the best you know how. And sooner or later, the book will find a ‘home’–an editor who likes your voice and loves your story. To thine self be true.

      ~I truly believe we must be true to ourselves as well.

      Also, rejects build a writer’s strength and underwrites their determination to publish. And if you’re going to be a long-term player in this business, you need this kind of backbone. Nice article, Diana. Well thought out. Warmly,

      ~Thank you for your kind comments and sharing your experiences. Your words are a wonderful inspiration. Take care, and I wish you continued success!
      *Hugs*
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:40 am
  6. Morning Diana!

    I’m still working on developing my rhino skin. =) The last rejection – well it took me almost a year to bounce back from and even attempt the story again. I struggle to understand why some feel it necessary to not only reject but to reject with a nasty/snide/unnecessary comment. You know? That just seems a bit of overkill…

    It’s best always to have vodka and chocolate on hand to soothe the pain! =)

    Thanks for posting with us today!

    carrie

    Posted by Carrie Spencer | February 12, 2013, 9:20 am
    • Carrie Spencer wrote: Morning Diana!

      ~:) Good morning, Carrie. Thank you so much for stopping by.

      I’m still working on developing my rhino skin. =) The last rejection – well it took me almost a year to bounce back from and even attempt the story again.

      ~It’s hard, but to protect our muse, we must focus on our belief in our story, and that out there is someone who will love it.

      I struggle to understand why some feel it necessary to not only reject but to reject with a nasty/snide/unnecessary comment. You know? That just seems a bit of overkill…

      ~I look at the rejections as their opinion. As to how it affects me, it’s MY choice. What I choose to say is, “Okay, they didn’t like my story. Now, to again send out the story to find someone who not only likes it, but loves it and wants to publish it.”

      It’s best always to have vodka and chocolate on hand to soothe the pain! =)

      ~Chocolate is always good!

      Thanks for posting with us today!

      ~It’s my sincere pleasure to be here with y’all today. Please take care, believe in yourself and persevere. I wish you every success!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:44 am
  7. I expected to receive rejections. I’m old enough to know that it’s part of life. I knew not everyone, including editors and agents, like the same voice or story. I recived nothing but rejections on my first book, until I got to the NJ conference and received 4 requests for partials. The book was still rejected, but it taught me I initially had a query problem. Fortunately, a friend told me to write three books, and I had. So I received wonderful help from Delilah Marvelle and sent out 40 queries. I received several requests for partials, two request for fulls and an agent. Now my first three books are being released by Kensington in the fall.

    I also learned how to edit.

    Rejection is not something an author should take as a personal affront, but as an exercise in making one a better writer.

    Posted by Ella Quinn | February 12, 2013, 9:37 am
    • Ella Quinn said: I expected to receive rejections. I’m old enough to know that it’s part of life. I knew not everyone, including editors and agents, like the same voice or story. I recived nothing but rejections on my first book, until I got to the NJ conference and received 4 requests for partials.

      ~Wow that’s fantastic, 4 requests. :)

      The book was still rejected, but it taught me I initially had a query problem.

      ~Excellent lesson learned. Writing a strong query is essential.

      Fortunately, a friend told me to write three books, and I had. So I received wonderful help from Delilah Marvelle and sent out 40 queries. I received several requests for partials, two request for fulls and an agent. Now my first three books are being released by Kensington in the fall.

      ~*Hugs* Ella, major CONGRATULATIONS! Love your tenacity and success! Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing. :) And, what a total sweetheart Delilah Marvelle is.

      I also learned how to edit.

      ~:)

      Rejection is not something an author should take as a personal affront, but as an exercise in making one a better writer.

      ~Exactly. Each book you write teaches you more about the craft. I was writing book #11 when book #8 sold. Take care and I’m so thrilled for you. I wish you every success! *Hugs*
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 9:52 am
  8. Hi Diana,

    I think rejection has taught me not to let other people’s opinions define how I view myself and my work. I kept writing through all of the many rejections, and it served me well. Once I finally got an offer, my editor wanted to see all of my previous completed manuscripts!

    Posted by Diana Quincy | February 12, 2013, 10:45 am
    • Diana Quincy wrote: Hi Diana, I think rejection has taught me not to let other people’s opinions define how I view myself and my work.

      ~Hi Diana, thank you for stopping by and your comments. So true, rejections teach you to dig your heels in the ground and believe in your writing.

      I kept writing through all of the many rejections, and it served me well. Once I finally got an offer, my editor wanted to see all of my previous completed manuscripts!

      ~Wow, how fantastic is that! So exciting!!! Congratulations, and I wish you the very best! ^5
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 11:28 am
  9. Diana,
    Thank you for sharing this. Like you, I also am an optimist and believe every situation can bring seeds of wisdom and strength; it is up to us to cultivate them.
    Thank you for telling us the importance of remembering why we write. Understanding that love of story makes rejection so much easier! :)

    Posted by Tina Glasneck | February 12, 2013, 11:06 am
    • Tina Glasneck wrote: Diana,
      Thank you for sharing this.

      ~Hi Tina, always nice to see you, and thank you so much for stopping by. If anything helped, that’s what it’s all about.

      Like you, I also am an optimist and believe every situation can bring seeds of wisdom and strength; it is up to us to cultivate them.

      ~:) Exactly. Once we craft our stories, it’s imperative to shift from our emotional outlet to that of a business sense. Our books of our heart become a product to sell. Now, we’re dealing with the challenging world of marketing.

      Thank you for telling us the importance of remembering why we write. Understanding that love of story makes rejection so much easier! :)

      ~*Hugs* Embracing our writing passion is essential. Thank you again for stopping by, and I wish you every success!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 11:39 am
  10. It’s tough – rejection feels personal. I know, I know – we shouldn’t take it personally, but tell me what is more personal than a world you’ve created, populated with characters you adore? Add in the hours you’ve spent slaving over every scene, editing out every passive sentence and redundant word and it doesn’t get more personal than that.

    Posted by Maria | February 12, 2013, 12:38 pm
    • Maria wrote: It’s tough – rejection feels personal. I know, I know – we shouldn’t take it personally, but tell me what is more personal than a world you’ve created, populated with characters you adore? Add in the hours you’ve spent slaving over every scene, editing out every passive sentence and redundant word and it doesn’t get more personal than that.

      ~Hi Marie, thank you so much for stopping by and commenting. I agree, our writing worlds are personal. How can our writing not be with the hours, months, years we work to craft our books?

      But, when we move to the submission process, we must remember that we are no longer in the creative world, but we have moved into the industry side. Our books become a product. It’s like walking down the soup isle. Why do you buy a particular brand? What appeals to you? What makes you purchase the can of food? I make this clear guideline for me as it keeps the worlds of writing and marketing in a clear divide. And, saves a bit of hurt if a rejection comes. As consumers of books, certain things make us ‘buy’ a book. For agents and editors, certain things hold appeal to them.

      Please persevere, and I wish you the very best!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 1:14 pm
  11. Hi Diana,

    Initially I had a hard time separating my emotions from the action of manuscript rejection. Those early rejections felt like a slap in the face. But they didn’t make me give up. I was determined to show them! I dug back into my story, looking for areas of improvement and kept learning more about the craft of writing until I did show them.

    And one thing unpublished writers should know. Published authors still get rejections, especially if you write outside “your” genre, or there is something different about your story that doesn’t suit that publishing house. Found that out when I wrote a murder at a nudist colony for an editor who wanted fresh and original, but not that fresh. Live and learn is my motto.

    Great post!

    Posted by Maggie Toussaint | February 12, 2013, 2:35 pm
    • Maggie Toussaint wrote: Hi Diana,

      ~Hi Maggie, always wonderful to see you! *Hugs*

      Initially I had a hard time separating my emotions from the action of manuscript rejection. Those early rejections felt like a slap in the face.

      ~I’m glad you said this as with each year I write, I find it easier to put the rejections in perspective. I’m not saying it’s easier to be rejected as the years pass, but in the business sense, you realize it’s part of being a writer.

      But they didn’t make me give up. I was determined to show them! I dug back into my story, looking for areas of improvement and kept learning more about the craft of writing until I did show them.

      ~I agree, the key is to push forward and continually hone your craft. It’s essential.

      And one thing unpublished writers should know. Published authors still get rejections, especially if you write outside “your” genre, or there is something different about your story that doesn’t suit that publishing house. Found that out when I wrote a murder at a nudist colony for an editor who wanted fresh and original, but not that fresh. Live and learn is my motto. Great post!

      ~Thank you so much for sharing your insight, Maggie. You’re a tremendous inspiration to me, and I enjoy your stories. Take care, and I wish you continued success! *Hugs*
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 3:01 pm
  12. Terrific lessons and an excellent post, Diana. I would expect no less from a Navy Chief. Rejections actually taught me how to handle disappointment. I learned quickly that all the weeping and wailing in the world wouldn’t make my book better. However, I also learned that the human being in me is entitled to feel, maybe even indulge that disappointment for the sake of my mental health if for no other reason. My solution was to allow myself 24 hours to mope, whine, cry, whatever–I am not allowed to respond to the rejection during this period. After 24 hours, I put on my big girl panties and act like the mature, sensible adult I am. That’s what I learned.

    Posted by Rue Allyn | February 12, 2013, 4:13 pm
    • Rue Allyn commented: Terrific lessons and an excellent post, Diana. I would expect no less from a Navy Chief.

      ~:) Hi Rue, thank you so much for stopping by and your kind comments. RomVets rock!

      Rejections actually taught me how to handle disappointment. I learned quickly that all the weeping and wailing in the world wouldn’t make my book better. However, I also learned that the human being in me is entitled to feel, maybe even indulge that disappointment for the sake of my mental health if for no other reason. My solution was to allow myself 24 hours to mope, whine, cry, whatever–I am not allowed to respond to the rejection during this period. After 24 hours, I put on my big girl panties and act like the mature, sensible adult I am. That’s what I learned.

      ~Excellent lesson to share. I agree, it’s important to acknowledge your emotions, then move forward in a constructive manner. Take care, and I wish you every success!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 13, 2013, 12:32 pm
  13. Hi Diana,

    There’s no magic elixir to banish the sting of rejection! I would scan the judges’ comments once and not look at them again for a month. While it’s tempting to make changes based on the suggestions of others, I tell myself that it’s my story and no one knows it better than I do.

    Thanks for joining us today.

    Posted by Jennifer Tanner | February 12, 2013, 4:31 pm
    • Jennifer Tanner said: Hi Diana,

      ~Hi Jennifer, thank you so much for stopping by today.

      There’s no magic elixir to banish the sting of rejection!

      ~So true. Each one hurts, but at times we’re mentally stronger to push past a rejection than others. But, over time we overcome each and every one.

      I would scan the judges’ comments once and not look at them again for a month. While it’s tempting to make changes based on the suggestions of others, I tell myself that it’s my story and no one knows it better than I do.

      ~I agree. Judges comments if you ‘feel’ they address an issue can be of help. If so, then I’ll incorporate something to address the issue.

      Thanks for joining us today.

      ~My sincere thanks for having me at Romance University today. An honor. Take care, enjoy your evening, and I wish you the very best!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 5:01 pm
  14. This post had obviously hit a nerve! I know I only give a book by another author 2 or 3 pages to hook me before I put it aside. (Sometimes one!) And these are published books! So I understand how subjective the process is.
    One thing I find helpful is to always have a few queries out, so when I get a rejection I file it away and think, oh well, maybe one of the others will strike the mark.
    I so appreciate published authors being straight about how long it took them to get published. It gives us “almost there’s” hope. So thank you for this post.

    Posted by Judy Hudson | February 12, 2013, 5:12 pm
  15. Judy Hudson wrote:

    ~Hi Judy, thank you so much for coming by.

    This post had obviously hit a nerve! I know I only give a book by another author 2 or 3 pages to hook me before I put it aside. (Sometimes one!) And these are published books! So I understand how subjective the process is.

    ~I agree, I’m fascinated by what intrigues one reader and turns off another.

    One thing I find helpful is to always have a few queries out, so when I get a rejection I file it away and think, oh well, maybe one of the others will strike the mark.

    ~The key is pushing forward, building on your knowledge of the craft and industry. There’s so much to learn, and I’m still learning daily.

    I so appreciate published authors being straight about how long it took them to get published. It gives us “almost there’s” hope. So thank you for this post.

    ~Judy, if anything helps, that’s what it’s all about. Believe in yourself, hone your craft and persevere. Please take care, and I wish you every success!
    Slaìnte,

    Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
    http://www.dianacosby.com

    Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 5:29 pm
  16. Robin,
    My sincere thanks for having me on Romance University today. To everyone who stopped by, thank you so much, it was a blast. Please believe in yourself and follow your heart. Only YOU can tell YOUR story. Take care, and I wish each of you every success!
    Slaìnte,

    Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
    http://www.dianacosby.com

    **Robin, if I receive any future posts, I will come back and reply. :)

    Posted by Diana Cosby | February 12, 2013, 5:37 pm
  17. Hi Diana,
    I submitted on a request off a contest win. It took them a long time to respond to the submission. Maybe 18 months. I received a rejection saying the editor was no longer with them and that they were sorry but the romance wasn’t strong enough and the plot was too episodic. At the time I had no clue what the last bit meant. But I wasn’t really surprised. I wasn’t expecting an acceptance I was so new to writing. I’ve learned what episodic plot is and made sure not to lose the romance in the early part of the story.

    Posted by Kathy aka C. K. Crouch | February 12, 2013, 6:49 pm
    • Kathy Crouch wrote: Hi Diana,

      ~Hi Kathy, thank you so much for stopping by. Always great to see another RomVet! ^5

      I submitted on a request off a contest win. It took them a long time to respond to the submission. Maybe 18 months. I received a rejection saying the editor was no longer with them and that they were sorry but the romance wasn’t strong enough and the plot was too episodic. At the time I had no clue what the last bit meant. But I wasn’t really surprised. I wasn’t expecting an acceptance I was so new to writing. I’ve learned what episodic plot is and made sure not to lose the romance in the early part of the story.

      ~Excellent lesson and thank you so much for sharing. Also, I appreciate your sharing the ‘wait’ time between submission and hearing back. It’s important for authors to submit their work, then move on with the next project for exactly this type of time turnaround. Proud of you for your perseverance, and I wish you the very best!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 13, 2013, 12:39 pm
  18. Thanks for a great post, Diana! It’s always hard to get a rejection but I’m happy (or if not “happy”, at least not as devastated) that mine are getting better – more detailed and helpful. I hope that’s a sign my writing is improving!

    Sorry I’m late with this comment, BTW!

    Posted by Becke Martin Davis | February 14, 2013, 8:00 am
    • Becke Martin Davis wrote: Thanks for a great post, Diana!

      ~Hi Becke, thank you for stopping by. If anything helps, that’s what it’s all about!

      It’s always hard to get a rejection but I’m happy (or if not “happy”, at least not as devastated) that mine are getting better – more detailed and helpful. I hope that’s a sign my writing is improving!

      ~It sounds crazy, but in writing, the more detailed the rejection the better. Editors/Agents don’t have time to comment on all submissions. That they decide to make in-depth comments on yours are definitely a step forward. ^5

      Sorry I’m late with this comment, BTW!

      ~Please don’t apologize. Thank YOU for stopping by. Have a wonderful Valentine’s Day!
      Slaìnte,

      Diana Cosby, AGC(AW), USN Ret.
      http://www.dianacosby.com

      Posted by Diana Cosby | February 14, 2013, 8:57 am

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